How to discover Ireland and its flavors in an ecological way through bars, restaurants and markets

A small guide for strategic and sustainable stops of taste, all accessible by train, bus or bike!
Ireland is a real treasure trove of taste treasures for those who love to embark on a journey of sustainability and with the desire to be green even when recharging after an excursion!

Belfast

The train is perfect for reaching Belfast and exploring some of the best food sustainability addresses. The Morne Seafood Bar is an offshoot of the place at the foot of the Morne Mountains: here, locally sourced seafood chowder, tasty casseroles and scallops give the sensation of tasting the sea.
Furthermore, reaching the parent company and, perhaps, exploring the mountains of the same name is really simple in an hour by bus from the city center.
Before heading out for a stroll in the hills around Belfast, taking advantage of some really beautiful trails , it’s worth filling your backpack with exquisite locally sourced picnic treats, taking a Saturday ride to the extraordinary St George’s Market . It is also worthwhile as it is housed in a fine, traditional Victorian market in the heart of downtown. Open from 9 to 15, in addition to allowing you to shop for taste, it is perfect for a coffee and to enjoy the music of local artists.
Another place to stock up on a super picnic is Sawer’s Deli , a real city institution where you can find Irish fish, meat and cheeses, as well as warm stuffed puff pastry delights. of delicacies such as, for example, O’Doherty’s black bacon, O’Reilly’s goat cheese or Armagh’s smoked turkey, to name a few. For a special moment focused on seasonality and a little Northern Class, the ideal is an evening at Ox , a Michelin-starred restaurant.

Wicklow

Those arriving in Dublin can head straight to Greystones, using the local DART train, and take a hike between Bray and Greystones on the Cliff Walk, where The Happy Pear , as well as rewarding with taste he will also be able to give an injection of good humor: an address famous for its organic vegetable-based proposals and a gastronomic icon of the county!
Also thanks to its founders – the famous and handsome twins Dave and Steve – who have become award-winning publishers and pioneers of the outdoors.
An example? For some years now they have been organizing open water swimming events, an activity that has made them very popular in their community. A couple of kilometers inland is the village of Delgany, where you can pack some pastries from the Firehouse Bakery, run by chef, baker and author Patrick Ryan.
Specializing in traditional, preservative-free artisan bread making, as well as carrying on the community bakery ethic, pair her irresistible carbohydrates with a stroll in nearby Glen of the Downs Nature Reserve.

Lead wholesome Irish food
Cork

In the 1980s, County Cork pioneered a real revolution in Irish food, with restaurants loved by aficionados from around the world swooping into Kinsale every year, or the inimitable Ballymaloe cooking school, renowned around the globe. And it is no coincidence that the latter was the pioneer of the slow food movement in Ireland.
The list of great restaurants of this glorious part of the island is truly remarkable. However, for green travelers arriving into the city by train, one of the best ways to get some flavor wonders close is to follow the Cork Culinary Tour. Allowing you to discover places such as the historic English Market, West Cork oysters and a gastro pub for lunch, in the company of knowledgeable local guides, makes for an enthralling journey-menu of sustainable tasting.
In the same way, you can also get excited by taking part in the Kinsale Food Tour and, even if the city is not accessible by train, by bus the journey on the number 226, which runs every hour, (buseireann.ie) only lasts 44 minutes.
To experience West Cork cuisine, in a small and delightful place, the bus is again a perfect way! Destination: Clonakilty, just an hour from Cork, where you can be sure of going out with a very pleasant feeling of satisfying satiety. The Lettercollum Kitchen Project is a veritable mine for picnics, with many ingredients sourced right from a field on the doorstep.
Scally’s SuperValu supermarket is also full of produce and An Súgán Seafood Bar & Restaurant has been run by the same family for over thirty years.

Galway Oyster and seafood festival
Galway Oyster and seafood festival
Galway

You can’t actually get to Galway by direct train from Cork, as you would have to go back to Dublin. However, you can take a bus for a 4-hour trip between the two cities, which is perfect time to get an appetite. It is certainly worth it as Galway boasts the world’s first oyster festival, which dates back as far as 1954. A great stop is the weekend market , a centuries-old presence in the city, which has hundreds of stalls dedicated to local food, with a great choice of opportunities for street food.
An excellent combination of craic (an untranslatable term that evokes the pleasure of being together) and cuisine is the one proposed by the Galway Food Tour , which also allows add a cycling lace to this interesting mix. An address not to be missed is Aniar , a Michelin-starred restaurant at the forefront of seasonal and local cuisine, wild and also enhanced by foraging.
Ard Bia is another sustainable gem that changes its menu every day to always be focused on local produce. Also highlight is the Brasserie on the Corner , which offers Irish delicacies such as Aran Island Crab Cake, Connemara mussels and also excellent top-notch beef. Two other must-see spots are McDonagh’s Seafood House and McCambridge’s Deli and Cafe .
Irish gastrocritics and guides McKennas call Goya’s the best bakery in Galway and Sheridan’s Cheesemonger and Winebar the best cheese shop.
Also to consult is the guide McKennas’ Wild Atlantic Way: Where To Eat & Stay, for many other gastronomic delights in Galway, a city that has always had a strong pride as a special place and which now also deserves to be the source of extraordinary gastronomic excellence.

Sheridian’s Cheeesmonger
Westport

If you arrive at Westport train station and are in immediate need of some goodness, you should head straight to Marlene’s Chocolate Haven to indulge yourself with homemade Irish chocolates and coffee, in one of the sweetest places in the city. Another place that is perfect for a sustainable snack is This Must Be The Place.
Right preparation for an excellent slow food dinner is a leisurely stroll along the seafront before reaching Pantry & Corkscrew: as a member of the Euro-toques (European Community of Chefs & Cooks) movement, has a deep understanding of slow food and suppliers include Westernshore Organic Farm, Mescan Brewery and Cornrue Bakery’s excellent leavened products (https://www.instagram.com/cornrue_bakery).

Slow travelers will also enjoy the Great Western Greenway which starts in Westport and ends in Achill Sound. The local community has cleverly created a Gourmet Greenway , with a map of local producers to make some greedy purchases or just to refuel after a day on the bike along its idyllic route. Gastronomic gems include The Blue Bicycle Tea Rooms and Kelly’s Kitchen in Newport, as well as the magnificent Mulranny Park Hotel.
Perfect idea: plan a tour, including a night at this iconic hotel, scenically overlooking Clew Bay. His food ethic is exemplary, his location extraordinary and his knowledge of all the eco-adventure guides in the region very useful.


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