Sanlúcar de Barrameda is Spain’s gastronomic capital of 2022

Sanlúcar, located in the province of Cádiz, near the mouth of the Guadalquivir River, is a privileged city with a rich cultural and monumental heritage as it is located on the trade route to America. It witnessed the third voyage of Christopher Columbus and the port of departure and arrival of the Magellan and Elcano expedition.
In 2022 there will be the commemorative acts of the V Centenary of the First World Tour (1519-1522). Its environmental environment has as its emblem the Doñana National Park, which is accessed by crossing the Guadalquivir river, and the La Algaida e Pinar Natural Park, a sort of natural ring that constitutes one of the green lungs of Andalusia, declared by UNESCO. as a Biosphere Reserve in 1980.

To these attractions is added its rich gastronomy, with exceptional and exclusive products such as Prawns and Manzanilla, a perfect combination that extends beyond the Andalusian borders and is one of the reasons why thousands of tourists come to this place. At the end of last year it was announced that Sanlúcar would become the new World Capital of Gastronomy for 2022.
The appointment was made official on the occasion of Fitur, the International Tourism Fair held in Madrid from 19 to 23 January. The Spanish Capital of Gastronomy (CEG) distinction was created by the Spanish Federation of Tourism Journalists and Writers (FEPET) and the Spanish Hospitality Federation (FEHR).

The purpose of this initiative is to contribute to the dissemination of the gastronomic offer of the city that each year holds the title, to propose actions that help increase tourism figures (Sanlúcar receives more than 80,000 tourists a year) and to enhance the programs of gastronomic excellence. The gastronomy thus becomes a perfect complement to the complete offer for leisure and party, highlighting the Manzanilla Fair, the boarding of the brotherhoods of El Rocío or the famous horse races on the beaches of the municipality, declared of International Tourist Interest in 1997. The historical significance of Sanlúcar, a crossroads of cultures and an ancient port of American commerce, is perceived at every step that takes place in its urban fabric.
The palaces, noble residences, defensive buildings and historic gardens mix with ancient cellars, from which the soft aroma of Manzanilla is released. The Doñana National Park, in addition to promoting natural tourism practically all year round, is also one of the keys to the richness of Sanlúcar’s gastronomy. Phoenicians, Romans and Arabs contributed the ingredients to the indigenous cuisine. The Christian reconquest encouraged the production of wine, which after centuries of skilful work, was consumed in the admirable diversity of current wines, among which the singular Manzanilla stands out.
The gastronomic evolution does not stop there, as after becoming one of the main American commercial ports and hosting numerous expeditions abroad, Sanlúcar once again sees its kitchens enriched with all the variety of spices, fruits and vegetables that have arrived. on the Andalusian coasts, before many other places in the Old World. Peppers, tomatoes and potatoes have given their latest impetus to both local gastronomy and agricultural production.

Corsa di cavalli a Sanlucar
Sanlúcar on horseback

Horse races on the beaches of Sanlúcar de Barrameda at the mouth of the Guadalquivir river, the ancient Betis, are the oldest in the country and have been held since 1845. They are the only races in which thoroughbreds have the opportunity to compete in a unique setting: a natural hippodrome over 6 kilometers long with the Doñana National Park and the sunsets in the background.

The flavors of Sanlúcar

The vast gastronomic offer of Sanlúcar is based on three important pillars: the products of its garden, those of its cellars and the fish of the Andalusian sea. Sanlúcar’s fish and shellfish, including shrimp, have a reputation that has transcended city borders. In Sanlúcar, the products themselves are as famous as the dishes prepared with them that form their culinary basis, rich stews with an authentic maritime flavor such as sour orange skate, monkfish with fried bread, galley soup, etc. . These dishes are generally washed down with the local wine, Manzanilla, as well as other types of table wine, which have a lower alcohol content and lighter color but have a unique flavor.

Sanlúcar de Barrameda is historically integrated into the Designations of Origin Jerez, Vinagre, Brandy de Jerez and Manzanilla de Sanlúcar de Barrameda. The cellars of Sanlúcar enjoy the constructive singularity of those found throughout the Marco de Jerez. These are high and well ventilated cellars, supported by slender pillars which give them their characteristic appearance. The city has recently equipped itself with a new enotourist resource: the Manzanilla Interpretation Center (CIMA) which includes about twenty wineries in the city and which, located next to the food market, offers visitors the opportunity to learn about the elaboration process. and aging of this unique wine.

Gamberi di Sanlucar
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IThe shrimp. The king of the sea and of Sanlúcar gastronomy

The Sanlúcar Shrimp is one of the kings of Cadiz cuisine, one of the products of the local gastronomy that has crossed borders to conquer not only the palates of the thousands of tourists who visit the municipality every year, but also the kitchens of nationally renowned chefs and international prestige, which have included it in their menu as a flagship product.
Its scientific name is Penaeus kerathurus and it is a medium-sized, edible, highly prized crustacean of high commercial value. What does the Sanlúcar shrimp have that makes it so valuable? The answer is easy: its flavor, a property conferred by its habitat: the Guadalquivir River estuary. It is a crustacean that is mainly eaten fresh. Its meat is very valuable. Cooked, fried, or as part of any traditional fish stew, it’s always a good option.
At Casa Bigote, reference point of Sanlúcar gastronomy, winner of the Bib Gourmand award from the Michelin Guide and a Sole from the Repsol Guide, they bet on cooked or fried preparation.

Manzanilla a unique and very special wine

Manzanilla is another of Sanlúcar de Barrameda’s “named” products. The vineyards, divided into “pagos”, grow centuries-old on albariza land (a land north of Jerez ideal for growing grapes). Sanlúcar currently has more than twenty wineries, which feed either on their own vineyards or on the must of palomino grapes (white grape from which Jerez and Manzanilla wines are produced).

The Sanlúcar marinera, seafood products and stews

Sanlúcar cuisine is a cuisine linked to tradition. A cuisine of maritime origin that finds a prominent role in homes. The special way of preparing fish in the municipality deserves a separate chapter. Frying the fish, with the right tip, reaches an almost sublime point and allows you to appreciate the textures of the different species, from acedías, tapaculos, pijotas, puntillitas, cuttlefish or mullet
Now these stews arrive from Sanlúcar all over the world thanks to the Senra family, who have innovated and introduced traditional seafood recipes in canning jars that only need to be heated to be consumed, bringing a little of the flavor of il more marine Sanlúcar.



The food market, the epicenter of Sanluqueña gastronomy

It is located in the heart of the commercial area of the Historical Complex of Sanlúcar de Barrameda. It is a municipal building occupying an area of almost 1,400 square meters, built in the 18th century and renovated three times, in the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries. The business returned to this square in June 2018 and has remained the hub of the city’s commercial and food and wine activity ever since. It has twenty-four fish stalls, twelve butchers, ten greengrocers, three frozen foods, one spices, one olives, sweets …
What stands out most is the seafood, not only for the quantity, but also for the raw material it offers. The excellent raw material that the Sanluqueños placeros display daily in their facilities has transformed the country’s Mercado de Abastos into a reference place for Sanluqueños and visitors who take advantage of the passage through the city to stock up on the best delicacies of the territory and the sea.

The sweet Sanlúcar

There is no self-respecting food that does not end with a dessert and Sanlúcar, among its many gastronomic charms, offers us in this field a variety characterized by the artisanal character and the quality of its raw materials. The walls of the convents of the many religious orders that were established under the patronage of the Ducal House of Medina Sidonia, preserve a large part of these sweet recipes.
The desserts made in an artisanal way by the nuns of the monasteries of Madre de Dios – offered to customers through their lathes – or of the convent of Regina Coeli have allowed to perpetuate over time unique flavors such as egg yolks, tocino de cielo, donuts with almonds, shortbread, pestiños, white donuts, cocadas-, which have been making for more than 40 years and which dazzle those who try them.
Alpisteras are one of the most typical sweets of Sanlúcar de Barrameda, traditional of Holy Week and which derive their sweetness from a touch of syrup. The dessert continues with an artisanal ice cream, enjoying the city of two legendary companies such as La Ibense Bornay – which exported its ice cream to Dubai – or Helados Toni, where the third generation indulges the wishes of the little ones behind the counter.

Tocino de cielo
Tocino de cielo
Plaza del Cabildo: a stroll through the tapas cathedral

Epicenter of the city, the Plaza del Cabildo is the gastronomic emblem par excellence of Sanlúcar together with the Bajo de Guía. The typical shrimp tortillas of Casa Balbino are memorable. And of the delicacy with a taste of the sea, in another of the corners of this cathedral, you can taste the authentic potatoes of Sanlúcar, aliñás, with a little onion and parsley, a good oil, sherry vinegar, loins of melva and game is done: the flagship product of Barbiana. Another of the classics of gastronomy is the Bar La Gitana. The well-known manzanilla gives its name to a winery that has gradually become another of the references of this square, offering excellent fried ortiguille.

How to discover Ireland and its flavors in an ecological way through bars, restaurants and markets

A small guide for strategic and sustainable stops of taste, all accessible by train, bus or bike!
Ireland is a real treasure trove of taste treasures for those who love to embark on a journey of sustainability and with the desire to be green even when recharging after an excursion!

Belfast

The train is perfect for reaching Belfast and exploring some of the best food sustainability addresses. The Morne Seafood Bar is an offshoot of the place at the foot of the Morne Mountains: here, locally sourced seafood chowder, tasty casseroles and scallops give the sensation of tasting the sea.
Furthermore, reaching the parent company and, perhaps, exploring the mountains of the same name is really simple in an hour by bus from the city center.
Before heading out for a stroll in the hills around Belfast, taking advantage of some really beautiful trails , it’s worth filling your backpack with exquisite locally sourced picnic treats, taking a Saturday ride to the extraordinary St George’s Market . It is also worthwhile as it is housed in a fine, traditional Victorian market in the heart of downtown. Open from 9 to 15, in addition to allowing you to shop for taste, it is perfect for a coffee and to enjoy the music of local artists.
Another place to stock up on a super picnic is Sawer’s Deli , a real city institution where you can find Irish fish, meat and cheeses, as well as warm stuffed puff pastry delights. of delicacies such as, for example, O’Doherty’s black bacon, O’Reilly’s goat cheese or Armagh’s smoked turkey, to name a few. For a special moment focused on seasonality and a little Northern Class, the ideal is an evening at Ox , a Michelin-starred restaurant.

Wicklow

Those arriving in Dublin can head straight to Greystones, using the local DART train, and take a hike between Bray and Greystones on the Cliff Walk, where The Happy Pear , as well as rewarding with taste he will also be able to give an injection of good humor: an address famous for its organic vegetable-based proposals and a gastronomic icon of the county!
Also thanks to its founders – the famous and handsome twins Dave and Steve – who have become award-winning publishers and pioneers of the outdoors.
An example? For some years now they have been organizing open water swimming events, an activity that has made them very popular in their community. A couple of kilometers inland is the village of Delgany, where you can pack some pastries from the Firehouse Bakery, run by chef, baker and author Patrick Ryan.
Specializing in traditional, preservative-free artisan bread making, as well as carrying on the community bakery ethic, pair her irresistible carbohydrates with a stroll in nearby Glen of the Downs Nature Reserve.

Lead wholesome Irish food
Cork

In the 1980s, County Cork pioneered a real revolution in Irish food, with restaurants loved by aficionados from around the world swooping into Kinsale every year, or the inimitable Ballymaloe cooking school, renowned around the globe. And it is no coincidence that the latter was the pioneer of the slow food movement in Ireland.
The list of great restaurants of this glorious part of the island is truly remarkable. However, for green travelers arriving into the city by train, one of the best ways to get some flavor wonders close is to follow the Cork Culinary Tour. Allowing you to discover places such as the historic English Market, West Cork oysters and a gastro pub for lunch, in the company of knowledgeable local guides, makes for an enthralling journey-menu of sustainable tasting.
In the same way, you can also get excited by taking part in the Kinsale Food Tour and, even if the city is not accessible by train, by bus the journey on the number 226, which runs every hour, (buseireann.ie) only lasts 44 minutes.
To experience West Cork cuisine, in a small and delightful place, the bus is again a perfect way! Destination: Clonakilty, just an hour from Cork, where you can be sure of going out with a very pleasant feeling of satisfying satiety. The Lettercollum Kitchen Project is a veritable mine for picnics, with many ingredients sourced right from a field on the doorstep.
Scally’s SuperValu supermarket is also full of produce and An Súgán Seafood Bar & Restaurant has been run by the same family for over thirty years.

Galway Oyster and seafood festival
Galway Oyster and seafood festival
Galway

You can’t actually get to Galway by direct train from Cork, as you would have to go back to Dublin. However, you can take a bus for a 4-hour trip between the two cities, which is perfect time to get an appetite. It is certainly worth it as Galway boasts the world’s first oyster festival, which dates back as far as 1954. A great stop is the weekend market , a centuries-old presence in the city, which has hundreds of stalls dedicated to local food, with a great choice of opportunities for street food.
An excellent combination of craic (an untranslatable term that evokes the pleasure of being together) and cuisine is the one proposed by the Galway Food Tour , which also allows add a cycling lace to this interesting mix. An address not to be missed is Aniar , a Michelin-starred restaurant at the forefront of seasonal and local cuisine, wild and also enhanced by foraging.
Ard Bia is another sustainable gem that changes its menu every day to always be focused on local produce. Also highlight is the Brasserie on the Corner , which offers Irish delicacies such as Aran Island Crab Cake, Connemara mussels and also excellent top-notch beef. Two other must-see spots are McDonagh’s Seafood House and McCambridge’s Deli and Cafe .
Irish gastrocritics and guides McKennas call Goya’s the best bakery in Galway and Sheridan’s Cheesemonger and Winebar the best cheese shop.
Also to consult is the guide McKennas’ Wild Atlantic Way: Where To Eat & Stay, for many other gastronomic delights in Galway, a city that has always had a strong pride as a special place and which now also deserves to be the source of extraordinary gastronomic excellence.

Sheridian’s Cheeesmonger
Westport

If you arrive at Westport train station and are in immediate need of some goodness, you should head straight to Marlene’s Chocolate Haven to indulge yourself with homemade Irish chocolates and coffee, in one of the sweetest places in the city. Another place that is perfect for a sustainable snack is This Must Be The Place.
Right preparation for an excellent slow food dinner is a leisurely stroll along the seafront before reaching Pantry & Corkscrew: as a member of the Euro-toques (European Community of Chefs & Cooks) movement, has a deep understanding of slow food and suppliers include Westernshore Organic Farm, Mescan Brewery and Cornrue Bakery’s excellent leavened products (https://www.instagram.com/cornrue_bakery).

Slow travelers will also enjoy the Great Western Greenway which starts in Westport and ends in Achill Sound. The local community has cleverly created a Gourmet Greenway , with a map of local producers to make some greedy purchases or just to refuel after a day on the bike along its idyllic route. Gastronomic gems include The Blue Bicycle Tea Rooms and Kelly’s Kitchen in Newport, as well as the magnificent Mulranny Park Hotel.
Perfect idea: plan a tour, including a night at this iconic hotel, scenically overlooking Clew Bay. His food ethic is exemplary, his location extraordinary and his knowledge of all the eco-adventure guides in the region very useful.


Cretan Easter and its local delicacies

Crete has always been famous for its culinary delights, as well as for the beauty of its sea and its territory. If you happen to be on the Greek island on Easter days, you will have the unique opportunity to discover local delights that only Crete or Greece can offer.

On Holy Thursday, local sweet cheese cakes such as kalitsounia, anevata and lychnarakia are prepared.
On Saturdays, on the other hand, tasty meat dishes are prepared such as mageiritsa (a meat soup based on finely chopped lamb offal, lemon juice, lettuce and dill) or gardoumakia (lamb bacon wrapped in offal) baked or stewed on the stove; fresh cheese and a red wine.

Kalitsounia, Crete
Cretan cheese sweets (Kalitsounia) on a restaurant table, as a gift for guests in honor of the Easter holidays

For Easter day, lamb or kid on a spit roast are traditional Sunday dishes in Crete, which are often prepared using hot embers left directly on the ground.
The party continues with friends and relatives with whom they drink wine, tsikoudia (a strong traditional liqueur), dancing and singing Greek folk music.


Abu Dhabi will celebrate culinary excellence with the launch of the 50 Best Week Abu Dhabi

To celebrate the inauguration of the 50 Best Restaurants Awards of the Middle East and North Africa on February 7, the Department of Culture and Tourism – Abu Dhabi (DCT Abu Dhabi) has announced the launch of the 50 Best Week Abu Dhabi, a culinary festival with experiential dining experiences, cooking masterclasses and unique collaborative dinners.

From February 4-11, 2022, the eight-day culinary festival will feature the city’s vibrant food experiences and some of its best restaurants. Ideal for food lovers looking to explore Abu Dhabi’s diverse culinary scene, the event will be filled with mouth-watering moments, with renowned international chefs coming to the UAE capital to showcase their skills and local Emirati talents who will show their skills.

Culinary leaders will provide insights into their food philosophy by inspiring food lovers of their dishes, ingredients, stories and experiences. The acclaimed restaurant awards and gala dinner will recognize 50 outstanding restaurants from across the region that showcase their culinary excellence and dining experiences.

Fatima Saeed Al Baloushi, Acting Director of DCT’s Abu Dhabi Events Bureau, said, “We are thrilled to celebrate culinary excellence throughout Abu Dhabi, reaching out to residents and visitors alike, seasoned food lovers and diners alike. more casual by offering them a taste of our varied food and to try the excellent dishes of some of the world’s leading chefs who will head to our multicultural capital next month.”

Dish prepared at the Abu Dhabi Food Festival
Department of Culture and Tourism – Abu Dhabi

Dish prepared at the Abu Dhabi Food Festival
Department of Culture and Tourism – Abu Dhabi

Events include three interactive Masterclasses taking place on Friday 4th February, in which acclaimed chefs from around the world will showcase their skills as they prepare signature dishes in front of a live audience.

The Chefs – Tim Raue of the Tim Raue Restaurant in Berlin; the innovative confectioner Will Goldfarb and Pía León from Central; and Kjolle, the current holder of the title of best female chef in the world, will accompany visitors on a culinary adventure. Ticket holders will also have the opportunity to interact with international chefs.

In the Collaborative Dining Series, visiting chefs will join Abu Dhabi’s most esteemed local talent to create a variety of extraordinary dishes. Raue is bringing his taste to Cantonese restaurant Dai Pai Dong, blending his signature Asian-inspired creations with regional dishes to create a truly memorable menu, while Natsuko Shoji of Eté in Tokyo, winner of the title of best Asian pastry chef, will show his fusion of French and Japanese dishes at the Tori No Su restaurant.

Additionally, Julien Royer of Odette in Singapore, a two-time Best Restaurant in Asia winner, joins forces with LPM to offer a unique collaborative menu that will combine some of the biggest hits from both restaurants for one night only. Budding barbecue masters can light the fire as Dave Pynt, of Burnt Ends in Singapore, showcases his talent in a one-of-a-kind experiential culinary event “Playing with Fire” at Emirates Palace.

Meanwhile, León will host an exclusive “Peruvian Paradise” lunch at Zaya Nurai Island. Showcasing some of the city’s best regional culinary talent continues with Chef’s Table promotions, taking place across the city from February 4th to 11th. On these incredible dining experiences, guests will be treated to bespoke menus created by some of Abu Dhabi’s best chefs.

On February 5th, a live stage event, # 50BestTalks, will also be open to all food lovers, with leading chefs like Goldfarb and Kamal Mouzawak presenting and discussing current topics and trends, as well as personal stories about their travels. culinary. For the grand finale, the first list of MENA’s 50 best restaurants will be unveiled on February 7 at a glamorous awards ceremony.

Over the course of the evening, the emirate’s outstanding restaurants and culinary talent will be honored alongside colleagues from across the MENA region, with a number of special prizes.

Ibiza: a journey through beaches, markets, gastronomy and nature

Ibiza is well suited to all types of travelers. Whether you are a family, a couple, a group of friends or maybe sportsmen looking for a particular environment, in Ibiza you will find an island full of unique emotions and suggestions.
With its 572 km² of total area, Ibiza is easy to explore, as you won’t have to travel too many kilometers from one point to the other on the island. The points of greatest interest are generally about 15 ‘away from each other and thus, you will have all the time to discover the beauties, the beaches and the gastronomy that this Balearic island has to offer.

The pleasures of the island

Kayaking in Ibiza
Kayaking in Ibiza
Image from Promoción Turística de Ibiza

Ibiza enjoys a typical Mediterranean climate that allows you to visit it, taking advantage of a good climate all year round.
With 3000 hours of sunshine per year, very little rainfall, turquoise waters and the possibility of practicing many “sea sports”, Ibiza offers many possibilities and freedom for recreation.
There is certainly no lack of nature, sunsets, the typical scents of the Mediterranean and the opportunity to fully enjoy the beaches of the island.


The nature

Posidonia Oceanica
Posidonia Oceanica
Underwater sea, Mediterranean, Balearic Islands, Ibiza, Spain

40% of the island is covered with pine and juniper forests divided into 1800 different species.
The flora, of the Mediterranean type, has a variety of 940 different species. 43% of Ibiza’s land area is protected, of which around 18% is divided into eight natural areas.
If that wasn’t enough, keep in mind that 75.4% of the island’s coastline is protected. Just to name a few, make a note of the Marine Reserve of the north-east coast of Ibiza-Tagomago, the Natural Reserves of Es Vedrà, Es Vedranell and the islets to the west.
Although the wetlands of the island attract many species of birds, the characteristic animal of Ibiza remains the pythous lizard, easy to spot on the walls or in the paths.

Ibizan podenco
Podenco
Promoción turistica de Ibiza
Image by Vincent Marí

Another characteristic animal of the island is the Ibizan podenco, a particular breed of native dog of Egyptian origin that seems to have brought the Carthaginians in 654 AD, when they founded the city of Ibiza.
It is an elegant, agile, strong breed with a very supple walk.

According to UNESCO, Ibiza is a privileged environment for the conservation of Posidonia Oceanica, a World Heritage Site as well as an aquatic and endemic plant of the Mediterranean.
These aquatic plants are not only responsible for the purity of sea water but significantly contribute to reducing the erosion of marine coasts. Posidonia Oceanica is also a form of nourishment for various marine species and, for all these reasons, it is essential that it be preserved, avoiding damage or loss over the years.

Sea Salines, Ibiza
Sea Salines
Image by Vincent Marí

Sea Salines has become a natural park since 2001. With an area of 3000 land hectares and 13,000 sea hectares, the natural park of Ibiza is an environmental wealth and protected reserve for 210 species of birds, among which flamingos, Himantopus and the Balearic Shearwater stand out.
The park, thanks to its salt pans, is able to produce 50,000 tons of salt every year.


The UNESCO World Heritage Sites

Phoenician city, sa Caleta, Ibiza
Phoenician city, sa Caleta, Ibiza
Image Consell d’Eivissa

In addition to the aforementioned Posidonia Oceanica, Ibiza can avail itself of UNESCO heritage sites of all respect and historical importance. In 1999, UNESCO declared the walls of Dalt Vila a World Heritage Site, as the best-preserved coastal fortress in the whole of the Mediterranean.
The same goes for the remains of the Phoenician city of sa Caleta and the necropolis of Puig de Molins, perfectly preserved over time.

The Renaissance walls that “envelop” the ancient city with the Cathedral and the Almudaina Castle on top, are the most important monuments of Ibiza.
Dalt Vila is made up of narrow labyrinthine streets, calli and squares that give a sense of serenity completely opposite to that of the port, the bay and the commercial area of the barrios of la Marina and Sa Penya.

According to UNESCO, the remains of the Phoenician city of Sa Caleta and the Phoenician-Punic necropolis are a very important testimony of the life, culture and urbanization of the Phoenician and Carthaginian cultures.

The underwater grasslands of Posidonia oceanica represent a natural wealth both for Ibiza and for the global marine biodiversity. The so-called “lungs of the sea” present in the waters of the island are among the best preserved in the Mediterranean and, as such, they must remain.

Shopping and markets

Artisania market, Ibiza
Mercado artisania, Ibiza
Image by Jon Izeta

Shopping in Ibiza could be just as rewarding as doing it in a big city: from major international brands to small and young designers, passing through local crafts, it will be possible to find and discover everything on the island.
Dalt Vila, the barrio de La Marina, Avenida Bartolomé Roselló and Marina Botafoch are just some of the areas where you can go shopping for “depth”. Letting yourself be carried away by the colorful shop in the middle of a street is certainly the best thing to do. You can come in and find many surprises all of a sudden.

Sant’Eulària, Sant Josep, Sant Antoni and Sant Joan contain a multitude of excellent commercial boutiques inspired by local products where you can find authentic treasures.
The markets of Las Dalias and Punta Arabí are absolutely worth a visit. Las Dalias opens all year round on Saturdays, while in summer it also has a night “version”; unique.
Punta Arabí for 25 years every Wednesday with about 400 stalls.

But if you love stalls and markets, you cannot miss the local handicraft stalls at the Port of Ibiza, Figueretes, Sant’Eulària, Sant Antoni, Sant Joan, San Miquel or the works of the potters of San Rafael.

Local gastronomy

Squid fried
Frita de calamar
Image by Vincent Marí

The gastronomy of Ibiza is mainly based on the Mediterranean trilogy, consisting of wheat, wine and olive oil. The sea and the land so generous have always given possibilities and multitudes of traditional recipes, elaborated according to the season and the climatic conditions of the island.

Flaó
Flaó
Image by Vincent Marí
Ibiza wine
Vino de Ibiza
Image by Vincent Marí

The food markets


The traditions of the island

Ball Pagés: Traditional Ibiza dance
Ball pagés
Image San Joan de Labritja

Ibiza boasts a rich heritage of traditions that allow anyone who visits it to immerse themselves even more in the heart of the island. The island’s countryside has been self-sufficient for generations thanks to the spirit of self-adaptation and the ability of the people of Ibiza to make the most of nature’s resources.
On the island you will find many examples of traditional architecture that, over the years, have allowed the Balearic island to get the nickname of Isla Blanca. Just get lost in the back streets to admire how many white houses have been converted into restaurants or to discover some very white building submerged in nature.

Rural architecture in Ibiza
Rural architecture, Ibiza
Image by Vincent Marí

Ball pagès, the traditional Ibiza dance, stands out for being a unique folkloric representation in the Mediterranean. With centuries of antiquity and an uncertain origin, this ancient courtship dance takes place in all the popular festivals of the island and in the weekly performances scheduled during the summer tourist season.

Playing sports in Ibiza

By bike in Ibiza
By bike in Ibiza
Image by Jon Izeta

Finding a sport that suits you in Ibiza shouldn’t be difficult. After eating, shopping, sunbathing on the beach and maybe staying late at night, a little healthy sport would be good for anyone. A lot of greenery lends itself well to sports such as golf, horse riding, walking, running or cycling, while the sea and the beaches offer the canonical multitude of water sports such as kayaking, windsurfing, kitesurfing and much more.

It is almost superfluous to remember that Ibiza is also full of many sporting events throughout the year: marathon, half marathon, regattas, cycle tour, trial and much more. For professional and non-professional sportsmen, but also for all fans, in Ibiza there are always interesting events to follow.


What to do and see in Ibiza

Dalt Vila

Plaza de Vila, Ibiza
Plaza de Vila
Image by Aurelio Martinelli

All months are perfect for visiting the fortress district of Ibiza, although it is during the afternoons and summer evenings that you will find more “life” thanks to the restaurants open around the squares of Vila, Sa Carrossa and del Sol.
A walk to the cathedral and the castle will make you discover medieval palaces, secluded squares, art galleries and beautiful corners in the purest Mediterranean style.

The walls and ramparts: declared a World Heritage Site in 1999, the Renaissance citadel of Ibiza is the best preserved in the Mediterranean. It was built during the second half of the 16th century following the plan promoted by the monarchs Carlos I and Felipe II to modernize the military infrastructure of the strategic coastal territories of the Spanish Crown with the aim of improving the defense against attacks by the Ottoman Empire and others enemies of the time.
The complex, which was originally only accessed from the Portal de Ses Taules and the Portal Nou, is made up of seven bastions, of which the two on the western side are museumized: Sant Jaume and Sant Pere.
From the rest of the ramparts you can admire magnificent views of the city, the beaches of Ses Figueretes, Platja d’en Bossa, Es Cavallet and the nearby island of Formentera.

Museums:

  • Necropolis of Puig des Molins
  • Ibiza Museum of Contemporary Art(MACE)
  • Puget Museum
  • Cathedral and Diocesan Museum

The historic districts outside the walls: La Marina and Sa Penya maintain the port character of Mediterranean cities, with simple houses with white facades and a marked seafaring air. Located near the port, the streets of these neighborhoods are full of entertainment during the summer tourist season thanks to their boutiques, shops, bars, restaurants. Ice cream parlors and cafes, many with views of the marina and the luxurious boats that dock there. The Parque and Vara de Rey squares, with their remarkable colonial-style buildings, are worth a stop during a stroll through the center of Ibiza.

La Marina in te ebvening, Ibiza
La Marina
Image by Aurelio Martinelli
From Promoción Turística de Ibiza

7 things to do in Ibiza

  1. Go shopping in La Marina, Dalt Vila or Eixample, where Adlib fashion boutiques, stalls, traditional shops, national and international brands, art galleries, multi-brand shops await you.
  2. Take the water taxi that connects the district of La Marina with the promenade and the beach of Talamanca.
  3. See how the artisans work their pieces in the Sa Pedrera craft market, open to the public on Fridays.
  4. Enjoy the lively nightlife of the city, especially that of Dalt Vila, La Marina, the port, the promenade and Ses Figueretes.
  5. Walk along the walls from bastion to bastion, paying attention to its informative panels and museum spaces.
  6. Join the theatrical guided tours organized by the Municipality of Ibiza.
  7. Buy sweets in the cloistered convent of Sant Cristòfol, popularly known as Ses Monges Tancades (the closed nuns), and other Ibizan gastronomic products in the Mercat Nou and Mercat Vell markets.

Beaches

Talamanca, Ibiza
Talamanca, Ibiza
Image from Promoción Turística de Ibiza

The capital has accessible beaches where you can enjoy swimming and water sports. North of the town hall, in the bay of Talamanca, there is the 900-meter-long beach of the same name, with various services and catering. Closer to the historic center is the beach of Ses Figueretes, along which the district of the same name extends and a multitude of accommodation, restaurants, shops, cafes, bars and pubs. Following on from Ses Figueretes, there is Platja d’en Bossa, a long sandy beach shared by the municipalities of Ibiza and San Sant Josep which has one of the most developed tourist offers on the island.


8 things to do in Sant’Eulària

Las Dalias Market
Las Dalias market
Image from Promoción Turística de Ibiza
  1. Reach the islet of Tagomago by kayak or explore the stretches between Pou des Lleó and Canal d’en Martí and between Cala Llonga and Santa Eulària.
  2. Enjoy the rural landscape of Santa Gertrudis on horseback.
  3. Follow the circular trekking paths of the town hall, such as the one that goes up to the Torre d’en Vall.
  4. Surfing in Cala Martina and Cala Pada, getting started in the world of sailing on the beach of Santa Eulària and diving in Cala Llenya, Cala Mestella or Pou des Lle.
  5. Buy Ibizan-style souvenirs at the hippy markets of Las Dalias and Punta Arabí and visit the artisan market of Santa Gertrudis.
  6. Approach Sant Carles, Cala Nova and the hippy market of Las Dalias aboard a tourist train.
  7. Enjoy a trip along the east coast on board the ferry that connects the port of Ibiza with the tourist centers of Es Canar, Santa Eulària and Cala Llonga.
  8. Set foot on eleven shores in a single day following the Route of the Beaches, a circular route for mountain biking that passes through Cala Nova, Cala Llenya, Cala Mestella, Cala Boix, Es Figueral and S’Aigua Blanca, among other beaches.



The beaches of Sant’Eulària

Cala nova, Ibiza
Cala Nova
Image from Promoción Turística de Ibiza

Sandy beaches, steep cliffs rising from the coast, wild coves and a generous number of islets form the beautiful littoral landscape of Santa Eulària. Along its 46 kilometers, there are frequent shores of calm waters suitable for bathing children and with a wide range of services, such as Cala Llonga, Cala Pada, Cala Martina, Es Niu Blau, S’Argamassa, Es Canar, Platja des Riu de Santa Eulària and the urban beach of Santa Eulària, the first of the Balearic Islands to declare itself a “smoke-free beach” where smoking is not allowed.
The shores best known for their photogenic beauty are S’Aigua Blanca and Es Figueral – both overlooking the islet of Tagomago-, Cala Nova, Cala Llenya and Cala Boix – Ibiza’s only dark sand beach-, while the most intimate coves are Cala Mestella, Pou des Lleó, S’Estanyol and Cala Olivera.


What to do in San Josep

Es vedrà, Ibiza
Es vedrà, Ibiza
Image by Jamie Turek from Pixabay

The village of Sant Josep is quiet and surrounded by cultivated fields. Its small urban core has grown around its church and street. The temple was built in 1730 following the characteristics of popular Ibizan architecture and is the only church on the island with a sundial on the facade. You can have a coffee in the charming little square located in front of the temple, browse its shops and galleries and enjoy many local dishes in its many restaurants. In addition, fans of cinema and theater will find a rich program at the Can Jeron Culture Center.

The Phoenician settlement of Sa Caleta is located a few meters from the Es Bol Nou beach. This deposit is one of the four sites in Ibiza declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. Its origin as a settlement dates back to the 8th century BC. and you can see the remains of the urban layout and two ovens.

7 things to do in San Josep

  1. Visit the Ses Salines Interpretation Center near the church of Sant Francesc. Inside, information is provided on the ecological importance of the salt ponds, the dune strings, the Posidonia oceanica meadows and the cliffs of the natural park and on the numerous marine and terrestrial species that host these habitats, such as the pitiusa lizard (Podarcis pityusensis ), the seahorse (Hippocampus ramulosus), the peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus), the flamingo (Phoenicopterus ruber), the Balearic shearwater (Puffinus mauretanicus) or the stilt (Himantopus himantopus).
  2. Stroll along the coast in search of the surveillance towers in the south and west of Ibiza: Es Carregador or Sa Sal Rossa, Ses Portes, Es Savinar and En Rovira.
  3. See the Ibiza sunset from the various bars and cafes located in Portmany bay or from the shores of Cala Tarida, Port des Torrent or Platges de Comte.
  4. Practice numerous water activities in the bay of Portmany, and in the nearby tourist centers of Cala de Bou and Platja Pinet.
  5. Plan an excursion to discover the ecological and landscape values of the Natural Reserves of Es Vedrà, Es Vedranell and the western islets.
  6. Go to the Sant Josep market on Saturdays to look for local agricultural products (open during the summer tourist season) or take part in the colorful atmosphere of the Sant Jordi second-hand market (all year round).
  7. Climb to the top of Sa Talaia, the highest mountain in Ibiza with a height of 475 meters. It is one of the most attractive trips for hikers and cyclists in the municipality, as from the top you can enjoy a wonderful view over a large part of the island.

The beaches of San Josep

Platges de Comte
Platges de Comte
Image by Vincent Marí

Sant Josep has more than 20 beaches and coves for all tastes and needs, including Platja d’en Bossa, the longest sandy beach in Ibiza and one of the busiest thanks to the wide range of hotels, restaurants, clubs , pubs and water and nautical businesses.
The wild beaches of Ses Salines, Cala Jondal, Cala Bassa, the set of coves that make up Platges de Comte and Cala d’Hort stand out for their beauty and popularity, the best viewpoint on the famous islet of Es Vedrà. Other unique shores are Es Cavallet – of nudist tradition -, Cala Codolar, Es Bol Nou, Cala Carbó, Cala Molí or the beaches of Cala Vedella, Cala Tarida and Port des Torrent, with a family atmosphere.

What to do and see in Sant Antoni

Puesta de sol Sant Antoni
Puesta de sol Sant Antoni
Image by Menchu Redondo

The beauty of its bay, the spectacular sunsets with the Ponente islets in the background and a practically unchanged rural landscape are three of the great attractions of Sant Antoni, a destination open to all travelers that always surprises, whether near the sea or inland.

Sunset in Ses Variades: the stretch of the promenade between Caló des Moro and the breakwater is known as Ses Variades and during the summer it becomes one of the most visited places on the island thanks to the bars and cafes that play music at sunset, often offered by famous DJs.
Outside the summer tourist season, the promenade allows you to enjoy beautiful sunsets in a peaceful environment.

Route of the churches: the temple of Sant Antoni, whose origin dates back to the 14th century, is an excellent example of a Pythian church-fortress that still has its defensive tower and the starting point of this itinerary. Inland, the silhouettes of the small church of Santa Agnès, whose portico is located near the ancient main entrance, and the temple of Sant Mateu, crowned by a simple bell gable, give a singular beauty to the rural landscape of both. valleys.
For its part, a visit to the church of Sant Rafel, built in the late eighteenth century, offers an excellent view of the city of Ibiza and a curvilinear bell tower that gives lightness to the austere facade.

Almond blossom
Almond blossom
Image from Promoción Turística de Ibiza

Santa Agnès and the almond trees: this small hamlet is located in the Pla de Corona valley, one of the most peaceful places in Ibiza. The best time to visit is between January and February, when its hundreds of almond trees bloom.

The vineyards of Sant Mateu: the north of the municipality is traditionally linked to wine production and currently hosts the plants of two wineries on the island that produce wines with I.G.P. Ibiza, Vino de la Tierra | Vi de la Terra.

5 things to do in Sant Antoni

  1. Practicing water and nautical sports offered in the bay: diving, sailing, kitesurfing, paddle surfing, water skiing, parasailing, jet skis, kayaking, fishing …
  2. Enjoy a boat trip to admire the beauty of the cliffs of Ses Balandres and Cala d’Albarca, as well as the Natural Reserves of Es Vedrà, Es Vedranell and the islets to the west.
  3. Walk the coastal path that connects Sant Antoni to Cala Salada, go cycling in the area known as Es Broll, stroll through the Pla de Corona until you reach the cliff overlooking the islets of Ses Margalides
  4. Buy local products in the Forada Market (Saturday), at the Sant Antoni Agricultural Market (Friday) or at the Sant Rafel Handicraft Market (Thursday, from July to September).
  5. Visit a winery to taste the wines of the island.

The beaches of Sant Antoni

Cala Gració
Cala Gració

Sant Antoni is home to coves and beaches ideal for children who also stand out for the beauty of the environment or its views. Within the urban core of Sant Antoni there are the beaches of Es Puetó, S’Arenal and Caló des Moro, which are added to the beaches of the bay that administratively belong to Sant Josep.
A few minutes by car or bus from the town are Cala Gració and Cala Gracioneta, two coves surrounded by pine trees, separated by a small promontory; the turquoise waters of the photogenic coastline formed by Cala Salada and Cala Saladeta – one of the most photographed in Ibiza – and the stone terraces of Punta Galera, an ancient stone quarry that has become a favorite place for nudist practitioners.

What to do and see in Sant Joan

Sant Miquel church
Sant Miquel church
Image by Vincent Marí

Sant Joan and its church: the town that gives its name to the town hall is a quiet and charming place, whose few houses are located along the road and around the church dedicated to an John the Baptist. The temple, completed in 1770, is structured around a single rectangular nave with a ribbed vault and seven side chapels. Other hallmarks of the temple are its bell tower, built in the 19th century, and its portico with two arches. On Sundays, the square in front of the church becomes a meeting point for visitors who go to the artisan and gastronomic market.

6 things to do in Sant Joan

  1. Admire the beauty of the cliffs of northern Ibiza aboard the excursion boats that depart from Portinatx.
  2. Explore the surroundings of the beaches of Portinatx, Port de Sant Miquel and Cala de Sant Vicent on a paddle surf board or on a pedal boat.
  3. Follow the itinerary that leads to Punta des Moscarter and the homonymous lighthouse, the highest in the Balearic Islands; or walk down to the remote virgin cove of Es Portitxol, on the coast of Sant Miquel.
  4. Admire the fabulous views from the top of the Torre des Molar, located a few kilometers from the Port de Sant Miquel and where you arrive after a trek.
  5. Buy handicrafts and agricultural products from the north of Ibiza at the Sant Joan Sunday market.
  6. Get on the tourist train that leaves from Portinatx and discover some of the most beautiful corners of the north of the island.

The beaches of San Joan

Cala de Sant Vicent
Cala de Sant Vicent
Images from Promoción Turística de Ibiza

The north coast is home to coves for all tastes, from those with all services to those hidden under the cliffs, suitable for those who want to get away from the hustle and bustle or practice nudism. The beaches of Port de Sant Miquel, Cala de Sant Vicent, S’Arenal Gran, S’Arenal Petit and Port de Portinatx have equipment, restaurants, shops and water activity rentals, making them a very suitable choice for families.
Benirràs is also very popular, thanks to its hippy environment, its sunsets and the uniqueness of the landscape of its fishermen’s cottages with the islet of Cap Bernat. The remaining coves of Sant Joan are perfect for those who do not need services or for those who simply want a kiosk close at hand to be able to rent sunbeds and umbrellas: Cala de Xarraca, Cala des Xuclar, Cala d’en Serra, S’Illot des Renclí, Es Pas de s’Illa and Caló des Moltons.



The province of Cádiz: traveling between pueblos blancos, divine food and wine and hot beaches

Cádiz and its province are part of Andalusia, one of the most fascinating regions of Spain and, I am not exaggerating, of all of Europe. The province of Cádiz, which has 45 municipios and about 1,300,000 inhabitants, almost touches Africa with its coasts. The Strait of Gibraltar, where the Mediterranean and the Atrantic Ocean meet, is only 14 km from the coasts of the African continent and rest assured that a boat trip between Tarifa and Tangier will not take you too long. With an average temperature of 18 ° C, 300 days of sunshine, equal to about 3000 hours a year in which you can enjoy the blue sky in these parts, the province of Cádiz can count 268 km of coastline including 138 km of beaches.

But it is not numbers and beaches (not only) that I will talk to you this time. If in other articles on this site I have praised Andalusian gastronomy, today I will do it again, passing by one of the most beautiful things I have been able to admire while living in this beautiful Spanish region: the pueblos blancos.

The pueblos blancos

Arcos,
Photo by Santiago Galvin

The pueblos blancos are many, beautiful and different from each other. If you travel by car you will happen to “spot” some of them between Seville and Cádiz, so much so that you will want to leave the main road to run to admire all its beauty up close.
Arcos, Grazalema, Setenil de la Bodegas, El Bosque, Olvera and Zahara de la Sierra are just some of the best known villages that make La ruta de los pueblos blancos (the route of the pueblos blancos) a wonderful route between these white Andalusian villages.
They also have small or large hotels that allow those who want to stay at least one night and local craft shops that tell the past and present in all their purity.

Arcos de la Frontera

fPhoto by Juan de Dios Carrera

Arcos as well as being an excellent starting point for the Ruta de Los Pueblos Blancos is also considered one of the most beautiful villages in all of Andalusia. Its history and the sensational panorama that can be enjoyed from the top of the cliff where its major monuments are located, make it an almost mandatory stop when coming from the parts of Cádiz.

Setenil de las Bodegas

Setenil de las Botegas
Photo from www.cadizturismo.com

Setenil de las Bodegas has become famous for being the village of the rock. In fact, a huge rock hovers above several streets of Setenil, making an already beautiful village incredible for the white of its houses. A visit here cannot be missed, also for the views and the good food of course.

The queso Payoyo ( Payoyo cheese)

Tabla de queso payoyo _Setenil de las Bodegas
Photo by David Ibáñez Montañez

In the hinterland of the province of Cádiz, thanks to the production of cheeses derived from the milk of payoya goat and merino sheep, many national and international awards have been won. Among these, Queso Payoyo is one of the most famous cheeses produced in Villaluenga del Rosario, in the heart of the Sierra de Cádiz.

Olvera

Olvera
Photo from Cadizturismo.com

Olvera definitely has nothing to envy to the other white villages of the ruta de los pueblos blancos. Here the streets between the white houses, the vases hanging on the walls in typical Andalusian style and the streets that go up and down steeply are the order of the day. Getting lost in the streets of these small towns, savoring the beauty of the locals and the tastes of the products of the local gastronomy, is a pleasure that you cannot miss for any reason in the world.

The green way

Gree way
Photo from Cadizturismo.com

The green way also passes through Olvera, a nature trail that extends from the Sierra de Cádiz to the Sierra sud de Sevilla. Combining the Ruta del Los pueblos blancos with the green way could be a unique opportunity to admire divine places, explore the Andalusian nature, breathe clean air and eat excellent Mediterranean food from the area! For all the info on the green way, you can consult the dedicated website.

Zahara de la Sierra

Zahara de la Sierra
Photo by Andrés M. Dimungues Romero

Calle Ronda.
I only tell you this.
Zahara de la Sierra has many wonderful corners, including its incredible location, but Calle Ronda is something truly unique (to me).
An uphill street with a cobbled floor full of white everywhere with many terraces, doors and windows.
Andalusia as I like it …
The one that excites you just to set foot there …

Local food and wine

Olive oil
Photo from Cadizturismo.com

Most of the traditional recipes of the province of Cádiz have olive oil as their main ingredient, which since 2002 has obtained the denomination of controlled origin of the Sierra de Cádiz.
An oil has wild, slightly spicy and bitter aromas, the result of a harvest in rough terrain where massive production is almost impossible.
A divine oil.

The wines

Consejo regolador del vino de Jerez
Photo from Cadizturismo.com

Even the wines are starting to give a lot of satisfaction to this territory, traditionally linked to white and fine wines but which, for some time, have also been starting to produce excellent red wines.
The province of Cádiz and many of its municipalities have made food and wine tourism a major attraction for tourists from all over the world.
Jerez de la Frontera, El Puerto de Santa María, Chiclana and Sanlúcar de Barrameda together have more than 7,000 hectares of vineyards that have been producing Jerez wines and grappas for centuries. And it is not just an attraction for wine tourism lovers. Heritage, nature and landscape have made it all a wonderful place to spend whole days.

Manzanilla and Prawns in Sanlucar


Manzanilla and prawns
Photo from sanlucarturismo.com

One of the many things that you cannot miss while traveling in the province of Cádiz, are the famous prawns of Sanlucar de Barrameda and, why not, also one of its most famous wines: Manzanilla.
This almost perfect pairing lends itself well to a light meal on the beach. The ancient traditions of Manzanilla make it one of the lightest white wines of the Jerez cellars, excellent to be enjoyed with the famous prawns of the area.

The Cacao Pico

Cacao Pico
Photo from Cadizturismo.com

In the “marco de Jerez” wine area, you will find a liqueur born in 1824, still made today with ancient techniques that respect the times and the environment.
The Cacaco Pico was born in El Puerto de Santa Maria, not far from Jerez de la Frontera.
Cacao Pico is used in confectionery, it can be eaten cold together with ice cream or perhaps with ice cubes. It has received some awards, both as best liqueur and in some cocktails it was part of as a main ingredient.

Tarifa

Bodegón de Atún- Conservera de Tarifa
Photo from Cadizturismo.com

We move to Tarifa to discover two specialties of the gastronomy of the province of Cádiz and also one of the windiest and hottest places in the whole of Andalusia.
Tarifa is one of those special places you fall in love with, even if there are no gorgeous white villages or glaring monuments. In Tarifa there is wind, huge beaches and life even in winter when I first set foot there.
A student of mine used to say that everyone here is a bit crazy because of the wind that blows constantly.
In truth, the strongest wind I can remember was a night in Cádiz: suddenly a window in my room flew open and the Mediterranean wind entered my room without permission!
Together with the scents of Andalusia …

Tarifa
Photo by Peter Pieras from Pixabay

We were talking about the gastronomy of Tarifa, right?
Going around this town you will find many shops, bars, restaurants, people on the beach who surf and kite surf, but never forget that you are in Andalusia, the Spanish region where it can be very hot and where you can eat divinely.

Tocino de cielo

Tocino de cielo
Photo from Cadizturismo.com

Tocino de cielo is a typical dessert of the area, whose most famous schools are in Tarifa and Jerez. It is created with egg yolks, sugar and caramel and is the right dessert to sweeten your days.
One of the most famous pastry shops to try it in Tarifa is certainly the Pasteleria la tarifeña.


Before going inside and climbing the hills a bit among other typical dishes and some pueblo blanco, let’s stop for a moment on these two wonderful “sea view” specialties

Amontillado and shrimp with fried egg

Amontillado y camarones con huevo frito_ E Puerto de Santa Maria
From Sprint Sherry

Amontillado is one of the many wines of the area that you absolutely must try. It is an elegant wine that should be drunk chilled and is well suited to every need. In this particular dish, with shrimps and fried eggs, it enhances and mixes the flavors of the sea and nature.

Atún encebollado

Tuna with onion
Photo from Cadizturismo.com

With all the seaside resorts in the Cádiz Province, finding good tuna shouldn’t be a big deal. However, if you plan a trip to these parts, you will find that between May and June, in places like Tarifa, Conil, Barbate and Zahara de los athunes, various events called Ruta del Atún are organized, in which you will probably also be able to try many dishes at tuna base like the one in the photo (with tuna and onion).

Tuna fillet in butter
Photo from Cadizturismo.com

El gastor

Returning a little towards the interior of the province, you can discover other beautiful villages but a little less known to mass tourism: El Gastor looks like a real garden with its typical white houses like a true pueblo blanco, vases hanging everywhere , palm trees in the squares and huge plants scattered here and there.
El Gastor is also known as “el Balcón de los Pueblos Blancos” (the balcony of the pueblos blancos) for the position that favors the breathtaking views.
One more reason to come here, I think …

Typical dishes

Popular dishes from the el Gastor area include stew, soups, asparagus scrambled eggs, and others based on poultry and pork.
But a typical dish of this mountain town is certainly the Asparagus Stew (Guisote de espárragos) which is a compound made from bread, oil, water and of course ground asparagus. All this is served in a large family pot which everyone, provided with a spoon, bread and wine, can use and eat.

Algodonales

Algodonales
Photo from Cadizturismo.com

No, I didn’t go crazy all of a sudden! Algodonales is also a splendid pueblo blanco in the province of Cádiz, but I wanted to start by telling it with one of the many events that make it distinctive and famous.
The one in the photo above is the historical re-enactment of May 2nd (dos de mayo). Here in Algodonales the event that at the beginning of May 1810 put the inhabitants of this village and the regiments of the French army led by Napoleon Bonaparte against each other.
The battle left 273 dead and about seventy houses destroyed.
Since 2005, this celebration in traditional dress has been born, which aims to pay homage to the brave who faced the French army.

Split olives
Photo from Cadizturismo.com

Local gastronomy

Algodonales is located in an area full of olive groves. Olive oil in this area is an important and well-made product, as are the split olives (aceitunas partidas).
If you come here, you should definitely try the local cheeses and wines, but also a traditional pastry with a bit Arabian “tendencies”: the gañote.

Ubrique

Ubrique from San Antonio
Photo by CPL

Ubrique has been declared a historic site. In addition to pueblo blanco, keep in mind that a stretch of the ancient Roman road passes through here, revealing its ancient origins (photo below).

UBRIQUE (SIERRA DE CÁDIZ).-
Roman road that connects Ubrique with Benaocaz.- Photo by Fernando Ruso

Typical products and gastronomy

Chorizá – Ubrique –
Photo by Francisco Javier Sánchez Ramírez

Ubrique, like other mountain pueblos blanco, also has its beautiful food and wine tradition.
It starts with local cheeses produced in the area: the products from payoya goat milk already mentioned are among the best known.
Sausages, salami, hams and other sausages created with the techniques of the past are also excellent products to be enjoyed as a snack.
Among the desserts you can also try the traditional gañote here, which is offered among the participants in a dedicated competition once a year.

…and finally…

I admit it … when it comes to eating and traveling, life takes on a wonderful meaning and everything shines in a different light.
From Cadizturismo (thank you thank you thank you !!!) they sent me so many photos and info that I would like to continue this article indefinitely … Instead I close with the last three tapas, with the hope of returning soon, indeed very soon in this wonderful province!

Tapa de atún y queso – San Fernando –
Photo by David Ibáñez Montañez
Tapa de jamón – San Fernando –
Photo by David Ibáñez Montañez
Croquetas
Photo from Cadizturismo.com