Sanlúcar de Barrameda is Spain’s gastronomic capital of 2022

Sanlúcar, located in the province of Cádiz, near the mouth of the Guadalquivir River, is a privileged city with a rich cultural and monumental heritage as it is located on the trade route to America. It witnessed the third voyage of Christopher Columbus and the port of departure and arrival of the Magellan and Elcano expedition.
In 2022 there will be the commemorative acts of the V Centenary of the First World Tour (1519-1522). Its environmental environment has as its emblem the Doñana National Park, which is accessed by crossing the Guadalquivir river, and the La Algaida e Pinar Natural Park, a sort of natural ring that constitutes one of the green lungs of Andalusia, declared by UNESCO. as a Biosphere Reserve in 1980.

To these attractions is added its rich gastronomy, with exceptional and exclusive products such as Prawns and Manzanilla, a perfect combination that extends beyond the Andalusian borders and is one of the reasons why thousands of tourists come to this place. At the end of last year it was announced that Sanlúcar would become the new World Capital of Gastronomy for 2022.
The appointment was made official on the occasion of Fitur, the International Tourism Fair held in Madrid from 19 to 23 January. The Spanish Capital of Gastronomy (CEG) distinction was created by the Spanish Federation of Tourism Journalists and Writers (FEPET) and the Spanish Hospitality Federation (FEHR).

The purpose of this initiative is to contribute to the dissemination of the gastronomic offer of the city that each year holds the title, to propose actions that help increase tourism figures (Sanlúcar receives more than 80,000 tourists a year) and to enhance the programs of gastronomic excellence. The gastronomy thus becomes a perfect complement to the complete offer for leisure and party, highlighting the Manzanilla Fair, the boarding of the brotherhoods of El Rocío or the famous horse races on the beaches of the municipality, declared of International Tourist Interest in 1997. The historical significance of Sanlúcar, a crossroads of cultures and an ancient port of American commerce, is perceived at every step that takes place in its urban fabric.
The palaces, noble residences, defensive buildings and historic gardens mix with ancient cellars, from which the soft aroma of Manzanilla is released. The Doñana National Park, in addition to promoting natural tourism practically all year round, is also one of the keys to the richness of Sanlúcar’s gastronomy. Phoenicians, Romans and Arabs contributed the ingredients to the indigenous cuisine. The Christian reconquest encouraged the production of wine, which after centuries of skilful work, was consumed in the admirable diversity of current wines, among which the singular Manzanilla stands out.
The gastronomic evolution does not stop there, as after becoming one of the main American commercial ports and hosting numerous expeditions abroad, Sanlúcar once again sees its kitchens enriched with all the variety of spices, fruits and vegetables that have arrived. on the Andalusian coasts, before many other places in the Old World. Peppers, tomatoes and potatoes have given their latest impetus to both local gastronomy and agricultural production.

Corsa di cavalli a Sanlucar
Sanlúcar on horseback

Horse races on the beaches of Sanlúcar de Barrameda at the mouth of the Guadalquivir river, the ancient Betis, are the oldest in the country and have been held since 1845. They are the only races in which thoroughbreds have the opportunity to compete in a unique setting: a natural hippodrome over 6 kilometers long with the Doñana National Park and the sunsets in the background.

The flavors of Sanlúcar

The vast gastronomic offer of Sanlúcar is based on three important pillars: the products of its garden, those of its cellars and the fish of the Andalusian sea. Sanlúcar’s fish and shellfish, including shrimp, have a reputation that has transcended city borders. In Sanlúcar, the products themselves are as famous as the dishes prepared with them that form their culinary basis, rich stews with an authentic maritime flavor such as sour orange skate, monkfish with fried bread, galley soup, etc. . These dishes are generally washed down with the local wine, Manzanilla, as well as other types of table wine, which have a lower alcohol content and lighter color but have a unique flavor.

Sanlúcar de Barrameda is historically integrated into the Designations of Origin Jerez, Vinagre, Brandy de Jerez and Manzanilla de Sanlúcar de Barrameda. The cellars of Sanlúcar enjoy the constructive singularity of those found throughout the Marco de Jerez. These are high and well ventilated cellars, supported by slender pillars which give them their characteristic appearance. The city has recently equipped itself with a new enotourist resource: the Manzanilla Interpretation Center (CIMA) which includes about twenty wineries in the city and which, located next to the food market, offers visitors the opportunity to learn about the elaboration process. and aging of this unique wine.

Gamberi di Sanlucar
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IThe shrimp. The king of the sea and of Sanlúcar gastronomy

The Sanlúcar Shrimp is one of the kings of Cadiz cuisine, one of the products of the local gastronomy that has crossed borders to conquer not only the palates of the thousands of tourists who visit the municipality every year, but also the kitchens of nationally renowned chefs and international prestige, which have included it in their menu as a flagship product.
Its scientific name is Penaeus kerathurus and it is a medium-sized, edible, highly prized crustacean of high commercial value. What does the Sanlúcar shrimp have that makes it so valuable? The answer is easy: its flavor, a property conferred by its habitat: the Guadalquivir River estuary. It is a crustacean that is mainly eaten fresh. Its meat is very valuable. Cooked, fried, or as part of any traditional fish stew, it’s always a good option.
At Casa Bigote, reference point of Sanlúcar gastronomy, winner of the Bib Gourmand award from the Michelin Guide and a Sole from the Repsol Guide, they bet on cooked or fried preparation.

Manzanilla a unique and very special wine

Manzanilla is another of Sanlúcar de Barrameda’s “named” products. The vineyards, divided into “pagos”, grow centuries-old on albariza land (a land north of Jerez ideal for growing grapes). Sanlúcar currently has more than twenty wineries, which feed either on their own vineyards or on the must of palomino grapes (white grape from which Jerez and Manzanilla wines are produced).

The Sanlúcar marinera, seafood products and stews

Sanlúcar cuisine is a cuisine linked to tradition. A cuisine of maritime origin that finds a prominent role in homes. The special way of preparing fish in the municipality deserves a separate chapter. Frying the fish, with the right tip, reaches an almost sublime point and allows you to appreciate the textures of the different species, from acedías, tapaculos, pijotas, puntillitas, cuttlefish or mullet
Now these stews arrive from Sanlúcar all over the world thanks to the Senra family, who have innovated and introduced traditional seafood recipes in canning jars that only need to be heated to be consumed, bringing a little of the flavor of il more marine Sanlúcar.



The food market, the epicenter of Sanluqueña gastronomy

It is located in the heart of the commercial area of the Historical Complex of Sanlúcar de Barrameda. It is a municipal building occupying an area of almost 1,400 square meters, built in the 18th century and renovated three times, in the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries. The business returned to this square in June 2018 and has remained the hub of the city’s commercial and food and wine activity ever since. It has twenty-four fish stalls, twelve butchers, ten greengrocers, three frozen foods, one spices, one olives, sweets …
What stands out most is the seafood, not only for the quantity, but also for the raw material it offers. The excellent raw material that the Sanluqueños placeros display daily in their facilities has transformed the country’s Mercado de Abastos into a reference place for Sanluqueños and visitors who take advantage of the passage through the city to stock up on the best delicacies of the territory and the sea.

The sweet Sanlúcar

There is no self-respecting food that does not end with a dessert and Sanlúcar, among its many gastronomic charms, offers us in this field a variety characterized by the artisanal character and the quality of its raw materials. The walls of the convents of the many religious orders that were established under the patronage of the Ducal House of Medina Sidonia, preserve a large part of these sweet recipes.
The desserts made in an artisanal way by the nuns of the monasteries of Madre de Dios – offered to customers through their lathes – or of the convent of Regina Coeli have allowed to perpetuate over time unique flavors such as egg yolks, tocino de cielo, donuts with almonds, shortbread, pestiños, white donuts, cocadas-, which have been making for more than 40 years and which dazzle those who try them.
Alpisteras are one of the most typical sweets of Sanlúcar de Barrameda, traditional of Holy Week and which derive their sweetness from a touch of syrup. The dessert continues with an artisanal ice cream, enjoying the city of two legendary companies such as La Ibense Bornay – which exported its ice cream to Dubai – or Helados Toni, where the third generation indulges the wishes of the little ones behind the counter.

Tocino de cielo
Tocino de cielo
Plaza del Cabildo: a stroll through the tapas cathedral

Epicenter of the city, the Plaza del Cabildo is the gastronomic emblem par excellence of Sanlúcar together with the Bajo de Guía. The typical shrimp tortillas of Casa Balbino are memorable. And of the delicacy with a taste of the sea, in another of the corners of this cathedral, you can taste the authentic potatoes of Sanlúcar, aliñás, with a little onion and parsley, a good oil, sherry vinegar, loins of melva and game is done: the flagship product of Barbiana. Another of the classics of gastronomy is the Bar La Gitana. The well-known manzanilla gives its name to a winery that has gradually become another of the references of this square, offering excellent fried ortiguille.

How to discover Ireland and its flavors in an ecological way through bars, restaurants and markets

A small guide for strategic and sustainable stops of taste, all accessible by train, bus or bike!
Ireland is a real treasure trove of taste treasures for those who love to embark on a journey of sustainability and with the desire to be green even when recharging after an excursion!

Belfast

The train is perfect for reaching Belfast and exploring some of the best food sustainability addresses. The Morne Seafood Bar is an offshoot of the place at the foot of the Morne Mountains: here, locally sourced seafood chowder, tasty casseroles and scallops give the sensation of tasting the sea.
Furthermore, reaching the parent company and, perhaps, exploring the mountains of the same name is really simple in an hour by bus from the city center.
Before heading out for a stroll in the hills around Belfast, taking advantage of some really beautiful trails , it’s worth filling your backpack with exquisite locally sourced picnic treats, taking a Saturday ride to the extraordinary St George’s Market . It is also worthwhile as it is housed in a fine, traditional Victorian market in the heart of downtown. Open from 9 to 15, in addition to allowing you to shop for taste, it is perfect for a coffee and to enjoy the music of local artists.
Another place to stock up on a super picnic is Sawer’s Deli , a real city institution where you can find Irish fish, meat and cheeses, as well as warm stuffed puff pastry delights. of delicacies such as, for example, O’Doherty’s black bacon, O’Reilly’s goat cheese or Armagh’s smoked turkey, to name a few. For a special moment focused on seasonality and a little Northern Class, the ideal is an evening at Ox , a Michelin-starred restaurant.

Wicklow

Those arriving in Dublin can head straight to Greystones, using the local DART train, and take a hike between Bray and Greystones on the Cliff Walk, where The Happy Pear , as well as rewarding with taste he will also be able to give an injection of good humor: an address famous for its organic vegetable-based proposals and a gastronomic icon of the county!
Also thanks to its founders – the famous and handsome twins Dave and Steve – who have become award-winning publishers and pioneers of the outdoors.
An example? For some years now they have been organizing open water swimming events, an activity that has made them very popular in their community. A couple of kilometers inland is the village of Delgany, where you can pack some pastries from the Firehouse Bakery, run by chef, baker and author Patrick Ryan.
Specializing in traditional, preservative-free artisan bread making, as well as carrying on the community bakery ethic, pair her irresistible carbohydrates with a stroll in nearby Glen of the Downs Nature Reserve.

Lead wholesome Irish food
Cork

In the 1980s, County Cork pioneered a real revolution in Irish food, with restaurants loved by aficionados from around the world swooping into Kinsale every year, or the inimitable Ballymaloe cooking school, renowned around the globe. And it is no coincidence that the latter was the pioneer of the slow food movement in Ireland.
The list of great restaurants of this glorious part of the island is truly remarkable. However, for green travelers arriving into the city by train, one of the best ways to get some flavor wonders close is to follow the Cork Culinary Tour. Allowing you to discover places such as the historic English Market, West Cork oysters and a gastro pub for lunch, in the company of knowledgeable local guides, makes for an enthralling journey-menu of sustainable tasting.
In the same way, you can also get excited by taking part in the Kinsale Food Tour and, even if the city is not accessible by train, by bus the journey on the number 226, which runs every hour, (buseireann.ie) only lasts 44 minutes.
To experience West Cork cuisine, in a small and delightful place, the bus is again a perfect way! Destination: Clonakilty, just an hour from Cork, where you can be sure of going out with a very pleasant feeling of satisfying satiety. The Lettercollum Kitchen Project is a veritable mine for picnics, with many ingredients sourced right from a field on the doorstep.
Scally’s SuperValu supermarket is also full of produce and An Súgán Seafood Bar & Restaurant has been run by the same family for over thirty years.

Galway Oyster and seafood festival
Galway Oyster and seafood festival
Galway

You can’t actually get to Galway by direct train from Cork, as you would have to go back to Dublin. However, you can take a bus for a 4-hour trip between the two cities, which is perfect time to get an appetite. It is certainly worth it as Galway boasts the world’s first oyster festival, which dates back as far as 1954. A great stop is the weekend market , a centuries-old presence in the city, which has hundreds of stalls dedicated to local food, with a great choice of opportunities for street food.
An excellent combination of craic (an untranslatable term that evokes the pleasure of being together) and cuisine is the one proposed by the Galway Food Tour , which also allows add a cycling lace to this interesting mix. An address not to be missed is Aniar , a Michelin-starred restaurant at the forefront of seasonal and local cuisine, wild and also enhanced by foraging.
Ard Bia is another sustainable gem that changes its menu every day to always be focused on local produce. Also highlight is the Brasserie on the Corner , which offers Irish delicacies such as Aran Island Crab Cake, Connemara mussels and also excellent top-notch beef. Two other must-see spots are McDonagh’s Seafood House and McCambridge’s Deli and Cafe .
Irish gastrocritics and guides McKennas call Goya’s the best bakery in Galway and Sheridan’s Cheesemonger and Winebar the best cheese shop.
Also to consult is the guide McKennas’ Wild Atlantic Way: Where To Eat & Stay, for many other gastronomic delights in Galway, a city that has always had a strong pride as a special place and which now also deserves to be the source of extraordinary gastronomic excellence.

Sheridian’s Cheeesmonger
Westport

If you arrive at Westport train station and are in immediate need of some goodness, you should head straight to Marlene’s Chocolate Haven to indulge yourself with homemade Irish chocolates and coffee, in one of the sweetest places in the city. Another place that is perfect for a sustainable snack is This Must Be The Place.
Right preparation for an excellent slow food dinner is a leisurely stroll along the seafront before reaching Pantry & Corkscrew: as a member of the Euro-toques (European Community of Chefs & Cooks) movement, has a deep understanding of slow food and suppliers include Westernshore Organic Farm, Mescan Brewery and Cornrue Bakery’s excellent leavened products (https://www.instagram.com/cornrue_bakery).

Slow travelers will also enjoy the Great Western Greenway which starts in Westport and ends in Achill Sound. The local community has cleverly created a Gourmet Greenway , with a map of local producers to make some greedy purchases or just to refuel after a day on the bike along its idyllic route. Gastronomic gems include The Blue Bicycle Tea Rooms and Kelly’s Kitchen in Newport, as well as the magnificent Mulranny Park Hotel.
Perfect idea: plan a tour, including a night at this iconic hotel, scenically overlooking Clew Bay. His food ethic is exemplary, his location extraordinary and his knowledge of all the eco-adventure guides in the region very useful.


The Earth Day and the new video on the landscape created by the volcano of La Palma after the eruption

For the fifth consecutive year Earth Day is celebrated with careful audiovisual production that includes the wonderful and unique landscapes of the eight Canary Islands, with a special role dedicated to the new space created by the eruption of the Cumbre Vieja volcano on La Palma. This video will try to reach 5.2 million people, in particular Internet users who have a particular interest in environmental issues and nature tourism.

Earth Day, which is celebrated every 22 April, has in recent years become the perfect excuse to highlight the natural spaces of the Canary Islands which are now enriched by the newborn volcanic environment of La Palma. This new landscape is called to become a major tourist attraction that will serve to promote the economic recovery of Isla Bonita.
The celebration of this event consolidates the fact that the Islas Canarias brand has become a standard-bearer for the defense of the territory and the uniqueness of the different landscapes offered by the archipelago, great natural attributes of the destination.
With the celebration of Earth Day in recent years, the Canary Islands brand aims to strengthen in the minds of tourists its commitment to defending the territory and the uniqueness of the archipelago’s landscapes.

To achieve greater success in communicating this message, the target audience has been segmented so that the content reaches the Internet users most interested in environmental issues, nature tourism and the discovery of the landscapes of the destinations they visit.
Furthermore, it is hoped that this video will go viral on social networks thanks to the emotional message conveyed by the natural environments, fauna and flora of the eight islands.
This year the video was also made in vertical format to be able to share it on the reels of Instagram and its replica on Facebook.
The piece will be broadcast in ten markets: English, German, French, Spanish, Swedish, Italian, Dutch, Belgian, Irish and Norwegian.

Holy Week in Cádiz: hidden beauty

In the ten days between the Friday of Sorrows and the Sunday of the Resurrection, a total of 29 brotherhoods and a Section of Penance walk the streets of Cádiz. In total there are 52 steps and more than 10,000 people in procession. Both the images and the passages they pass through are authentic heritage jewels, some of which are more than 5 centuries old. As an Andalusian, Holy Week in Cádiz has a number of characteristics common to those of the rest of the region: color, music, the very passion of Andalusia is clearly reflected in Holy Week itself. But there are also several factors that make Holy Week special and different here.

We must start with the geographical position of Cádiz, a peninsula surrounded by the sea on all four sides with the exception of the isthmus that connects it to San Fernando (another island by the way) and the two bridges that connect it to Puerto Real . It is difficult to walk more than 10 minutes through the streets of downtown Cádiz without bumping into the sea, whether in the form of a beach or a balcony. The Holy Week tours are no exception and there are many brotherhoods and herndadas who have their penance station near the Cathedral by the sea. On many occasions they also coincide with the sunset, which allows you to enjoy unique images that cannot be seen in other cities. The light of Cádiz is different and Benito Rodríguez Gatiu, biographer of the great Ortega Bru, says that the image maker of San Roque spent several days in Cádiz observing how the light fell on objects to create the majestic Christ of forgiveness.

Semana Santa Cadiz
Sanidad-Ramon Sanchez

The city of Cádiz leaves all who visit it enchanted: its shape, its small size, its layout, its mixture of architectural styles resulting from its long existence of over 3,000 years make the city a treasure to be discovered at every step , at every corner, every square, every street has its history and Holy Week accompanies the visitor in all those places.
The vast majority of the temples are located in the historic center, the part of Cádiz of greatest tourist interest, a secluded area easily accessible on foot, practically flat and in which hotels and unique accommodations abound. For this reason, Holy Week is the ideal time to discover the three millennia old city which, when spring arrives, puts away the mask and pito (traditionally used for Carnival) and takes out the hood and the incense (which are used for Holy Week).

La imaginería

In addition to the city itself, Holy Week in Cádiz is characterized by impressive and sometimes unknown images. We must start from the assumption that during the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries the city was the main port of Spain with America, which made Cádiz a rich and prosperous city where merchants and artists from all over Europe came to embark for the Americas. . Many have left their mark here with priceless images. Unfortunately, the city has also suffered attacks such as that of the Anglo-Dutch fleet in 1596, the tsunami of Lisbon in 1755, the attacks of the radicals during the Second Republic and the subsequent Civil War who got fat with images, heritage of brotherhoods and temples. of the city. The oldest claim that the Nazarene of Cádiz himself was thrown on a pyre lit by the radicals in the preludes to the Civil War and that some brave inhabitants of the Santa María neighborhood pulled him out of the flames by dragging him by the hair.
His head and his hands were then hidden in a bucket at the bottom of a well on Calle Botica for months until it could be recovered and restored. Every Good Friday morning, el Greñuo, as the Lord is known to him in Cádiz, passes in front of that house on Calle Botica as a sign of gratitude. A great heritage was lost, perhaps the most precious and oldest, but fortunately another part was saved that continues today. The oldest image of Cádiz is the Lord of Sentence, in procession on Holy Wednesday and dated to the end of the 15th century. For antiquity and quality, two works by Jacinto Pimentel should be mentioned: the Christs of the brotherhoods of Humility and Patience and Columna, both of the seventeenth century. You just need to see them to realize their age, value and quality. But if there is a Christ in Cádiz that arouses the interest of all, regardless of their faith, it is that of the Good Death that is venerated in the church of San Agustín and that on Good Friday parades in the dark, with the only light of the its four aces.
Much has been written about this carving: we talk about its perfection, its forms, its posture. Some even indicate the possibility of studying anatomy given the technical perfection achieved by its author. But no one knows for sure who he was. He is one of the mysteries of Holy Week in Cádiz, or perhaps even of the history of the city. The theories are hundreds, even if one of the most commented and famous, even if not confirmed, is that it was the work of the well-known Gian Lorenzo Bernini. Álvarez del Pino justifies this hypothesis with the very high amount that appears on the receipt of the engraving: “In that document it is established that the Crucifix cost 300 gold ducats”, which provides another important key for Álvarez del Pino: ” Martínez Montañés, who we can consider as the Andalusian reference of the time, charged 2,000 reales de vellón for a sculpture; the difference of up to 300 gold ducats is astonishing. ”It is not unreasonable given the constant presence of Genoese, Venetians and Italians generally in the history of Cádiz, attracted by the potential of the city as a seaport with America Another illustrious and famous name linked to Holy Week in Cádiz is that of Joseph Haydn. The famous composer was commissioned to compose his “Siete Palabras” from Cádiz. It is controversial whether it came from the cathedral itself or from the Oratorio de la Santa Cueva in via Rosario. At that time Haydn was already one of the most famous composers in Europe, which shows the economic power and influence of the city in those years. Even today, every Good Friday, this work is performed in the Oratorio de las Siete Palabras, an unsurpassed composition and environment to be enjoyed together. Cádiz is Baroque, its period of splendor indicates it and this style is present in many buildings in the city, including, of course, its temples. Within the baroque in Cádiz, the Rocalla is opulent, a style that is not exclusive to the city but which plays a special role here, especially in the temples of El Carmen, San Francisco, the church of the Pastora de Sagasta and Santa María.

settimana Santa Cadice
el caminito, David Ibanez

The sound of Cádiz at Easter

In Andalusia, Holy Week cannot be understood without music. In Andalusia, music is part of our essence and flamenco, one of the hallmarks of Andalusia, is also very present during Holy Week. Historians place the origin of flamenco in the triangle formed between Seville, Jerez and Cádiz and flamenco in Holy Week has a name: the saeta. They are short and improvised compositions that are sung from the street itself or from the balconies. A saeta is a deep and sincere prayer that is born from within the soul and which expresses devotion and love for a Christ or a Virgin in the form of a song. When a saetera or a saetero sings, everyone is silent. Santa María is the flamenco district of Cádiz par excellence and you can enjoy the return of the Nazarene in its church at dawn on Good Friday, when the sun begins to rise, listening to saetas dedicated to the Regidor Perpetuo and his mother, Nuestra Señora de los Dolores , it is a unique experience.
Carnival, undoubtedly the great festival of the city, also surrenders to the charm of Holy Week in Cádiz and there are not a few who sing carnival songs in February and saetas in April. But music is not just saetas. The Cofrade music bands are themselves a vast world that moves many emotions and draws crowds, and Cádiz is fortunate to have one of the best Trumpet and Drum bands in Spain, Rosario de Cádiz, which bears the name of the city and its Holy Week throughout the national territory. Without detracting from other bands in the city such as Polillas, Salud or Ecce Mater.
In recent weeks a concert of processional processions was held at the Gran Teatro Falla and in less than an hour and a half the capacity was sold out. This can help you get an idea of ​​the attraction this music has.

Semana Santa Cadiz
Buenanuerte-jm reyna

The perfect excuse to “eat” Cádiz

The year 2019 began with an article in the New York Times newspaper that placed the city of Cádiz among one of the must-see destinations of that year. Among the arguments, together with the architecture and beauty of the city, he pointed to a hitherto little known reason beyond the Andalusian borders: its gastronomy. In Cádiz you can eat very well (here our article dedicated to the gastronomy of the Province of Cádiz) and a visit to the city during Holy Week is the perfect excuse to take a look. A good place to start is the food market (it does not open on public holidays such as Holy Thursday and Good Friday). There you can find freshly caught fish, as well as shellfish and other seafood. Right next door you can start the day with some good churros, like the ones from La Guapa or La Marina cafeteria. Afterwards it is difficult to choose a place to eat tapas, there are many and very varied. Of course, the tapa is always accompanied by a good sherry wine or a manzanilla from Sanlúcar.
Holy Week also has its classics, such as the empanadas of Casa Hidalgo in Plaza de la Catedral, an ice cream from the Italian ice cream parlor that opens every year just before Easter. Torrijas are a typical dessert of these dates that are also found in pastry shops and pastry shops in Cádiz, as well as donuts for Holy Week. In the coming weeks, the Holy Week of Cádiz will receive the Declaration of Festival of National Tourist Interest, which will undoubtedly serve to publicize this festival and this cultural expression so deeply rooted in this land, but which is in the shadow of other festivals of the city and other Holy Weeks in the area.

Source: cadiz turismo


10 things to do in Leuven, the little big Belgian city.

Leuven offers everything you could wish for from a welcoming, human-sized city that gives you the feeling of being a metropolis. Discover the traces of history, enjoying the creative and cultural atmosphere, the liveliness of the university and its students, the wide range of cafes, restaurants and shops. Leuven breathes tradition and innovation.
The city is easy to discover on foot through the compact urban center. Everything is within walking distance. In 10 essential points, what you can do to discover the little big city located in the heart of Belgium.

  • Climb the university library tower: Climbing the stairs, you will find a photo exhibit showing the turbulent past of this building.
    At the top is the balcony which offers an impressive view over Leuven. Enjoy the view!
    And don’t miss the Great Reading Room.
  • Visit the church of San Pietro to admire its beauty and the masterpieces located inside: The Last Supper is a jewel of Dieric Bouts. It is still in the place where it was originally painted. This masterpiece and other works of art can be admired for free in the church.
Dieric Bouts, the last supper in St. Peter's Church
Dieric Bouts’ Last Supper
Shutterstock photo
  • Discover Groot Begijnhof, the medieval town of the city: Recognized as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, Groot Begijnhof is a labyrinth of narrow streets, courtyards, monasteries and houses built in traditional sandstone in the 13th century.
  • Have a beer at the Oude Markt, the longest bar in Europe: Oude Mark is probably the most popular meeting place in the city. The square is home to many bars and restaurants offering the best Belgian beers … all to try, of course!
  • Count the statues of the famous people of the Town Hall: The icon of Leuven is the town hall, one of the most famous Gothic town halls in the world “carved” with biblical scenes. A true ‘Hall of Fame’ with 236 images of historical figures adorning the exterior of the building.
Town hall Leuven, Belgium
Leuven Town Hall,
photo by Shutterstock
  • Visit the oldest Catholic university in Europe: You can stroll through the historic colleges of KU Leuven passing by the University Hall, originally the hall of the city. The Anatomical Theater, the Botanical Gardens and Arenberg Castle are also part of Leuven’s rich university history.
  • Discover the birthplace of Stella Artois: Take the interactive tour of the Stella Artois brewery. Find out everything from the beer hall to filling lines in full action. Throw yourself into the world of brewing and enjoy a refreshing drink straight from the source after the tour.
  • Discover Leuven by bike: Leuven is the city of cycling for excellence. In reality it is not necessary to use public transport, because you can get everywhere by bicycle. Cycling is also a pleasant and quick way to explore the city, just like a true citizen of Leuven.
Bikers in Leuven, Belgium
Photo by Tobias Cornille on Unsplash
  • Relax in the park of the Abbey: This beautiful abbey is one of the best preserved monasteries in Belgium. The buildings, the gates, the church, the water mill, the barn and a fenced vegetable garden have remained virtually unchanged since the 17th century. An oasis of peace just outside the city center.
  • Visit M Leuven, the art museum for art lovers: M Leuven houses a collection of antique and contemporary pieces of art. The visual culture of the present and the past placed in an impressive decor. The museum building was designed by the Belgian architect Stéphane Bee.

Salzburg, UNESCO protected beauties and festivals

Salzburg enchants for its beauty thanks to many elements that distinguish it and make it unique. The unique position between the river and the mountains, the colors, the squares, the baroque palaces, the music and the colors.

The five squares of the old city are the heart of the UNESCO heritage which, this year, will celebrate its first 25 years of official recognition. Residenzplatz, Domplatz, Mozartplatz, Kapitelplatz and Alter Markt are the unmissable and iconic squares to be seen absolutely in Salzburg which together with the Hohensalzburg fortress form the UNESCO heritage of the Austrian city. On April 22, 2022, an Open day will be organized in Salzburg to showcase the beauties of the city on the occasion of the UNESCO World Heritage Day (April 18).
The Franciscan monastery located between the cathedral and the festival districts reflects Salzburg’s eventful history from the Iuvavum (it was the name of the city in Roman times) to the present day.

aged fortress square with leafless tree
Photo by Alexander Kozlov on Pexels.com

A stroll through the alleys of Salzburg

The historic city center of Salzburg, a World Heritage Site, comprises a total of around 1,000 objects and an area of 236 hectares (central zone I). It is impossible to visit the city without encountering buildings, statues and symbols in stone, marble or wood that do not testify to the importance and development of Salzburg. Churches, chapels, monasteries and cemeteries vary with gardens and castles and add to the world famous ensemble.
The magic of Salzburg also emerges during a walk through the alleys and passages of the old town. Each of these 13 passages, which connect the Getreidegasse with the parallel streets, has its own charm, appreciated by both locals and visitors.

Music City Salzburg – W. A. Mozart, Salzburg Festival and Adventsingen

The prince-archbishops of Salzburg were great patrons of the fine arts and thus laid the foundations for Salzburg as a city of music and festivals. Over the centuries, Salzburg’s court music has been able to compete with the best in Europe. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s father Leopold came to Salzburg for professional reasons. His son was considered a child prodigy (1756-1791) and is the most famous son of the city.
The Mozarteum Foundation was founded in 1880, 40 years after the Salzburg Festival. With the Camerata Salzburg, the Philharmonie Salzburg and the Mozarteum Orchestra, the city boasts first-rate orchestras and around 4,500 musical and cultural events take place in Salzburg every year. A particularly impressive musical event takes place every Sunday at 11:45 am: a historical custom is commemorated during the Turmblasen (music from the trumpet tower) at the Hohensalzburg Fortress. In the past, tower trumpeters were used to warn of dangers or to accompany important occasions

Salzburg Festival: Three well-known music festivals per year

  • The Salzburg Easter Festival was founded by the conductor Herbert von Karajan and has integrated the Salzburg festival program since 1967. The centerpiece of the Salzburg Easter Festival from 9 to 18 April 2022 will be Richard Wagner’s “Lohengrin”. American tenor Eric Cutler will sing the title role, Christian Thielemann will conduct the Sächsische Staatskapelle Dresden. This large international orchestra will receive the Herbert von Karajan Prize at the Festival. Richard Strauss’s Alpensinfonie will be performed, the work that the composer dedicated “in gratitude to the Dresden Royal Orchestra” in 1915.
  • The Salzburg Whitsun Festival was started in 1973 by Herbert von Karajan as the Whitsun Concerts – since 2012 the Italian singer Cecilia Bartoli has been in charge of the • artistic director. The program of the Salzburg Whitsun Festival from 3 to 6 June 2022 revolves around the Spanish city of Seville. Gioachino Rossini’s opera Il Barbiere di Siviglia will see Cecilia Bartoli in the role of Rosina, the role she once made her professional debut in. The concert program is also dedicated to the essence of Andalusian culture. www.salzburgerfestspiele.at
  • The Salzburg Festival in summer is the world’s leading festival for classical music and the performing arts. From 18 July to 31 August 2022, the Salzburg Festival will present 174 performances over 45 days across 17 venues. Highlights of the opera include Mozart’s The Magic Flute and Verdi’s Aida. In addition to Jedermann, the theatrical program includes Schnitzler’s Reigen. In addition to the Spirituelle Overture entitled Sacrificium, the concerts will feature first-rate orchestras and soloists. www.salzburgerfestspiele.at

Other information:


Tourismus Salisburgo, Auerspergstraße 6, 5020 Salisburgo, Austria,
Tel.: +43/662/889 87 – 0,
Fax: +43/662/889 87 – 32,
www.salzburg.info,
#visitsalzburg

The magic of spring in Formentera

The nature of Formentera can offer incredible landscapes thanks to the variety of vegetation that grows on the island. The lowest level of rainfall in the Balearic Islands make it a privileged island to be discovered in spring, when the beauty of colors and nature show off all their splendor.

Starting from the forests full of junipers and pines, in Formentera you can discover various plant forms such as rosemary, heather and aromatic thyme, strawberry tree as well as a large area of Mediterranean scrub.
17 species of orchids grow in Formentera. This splendid flower requires special conditions, undisturbed soils and particular pollination strategies. It goes without saying that only here can they grow and find particular conditions and the right stability.
Leave them in their habitat and just photograph them!

The fruit trees are colored in spring, giving tasty fruits in the following months. The fig is the symbol of the island but there is no lack of almond, carob and olive trees. The spring fields are colored with poppies, marigolds, daisies and gladioli.

The beaches of Formentera are home to some of the best preserved dunes in the Balearic Islands, such as Ses Illetes, Cavall d’en Borràs, Levante, Migjorn or s’Alga (on the island of s’Espalmador). They include a submerged part – the cliffs formed by the Posidonia oceanica meadows – and an emerged part, the plants that grow on the dunes, with their deep roots, retain the sandy substratum and fix these dunes.

Valencians Beach; Formentera
Valencians Beach; Formentera

Endemic and coastal plants

In the vicinity of the salt pans various endemic species can be found, such as ‘Limonium formenterae‘, ‘Limonium wiedmanni’ or ‘Limonium gosii’. The rocky stretches of the coast have a more impoverished vegetation. The most common are the ‘Limonium minutum‘, exclusive to the Balearic Islands, and the ‘Limonium cassonianum’ which has white flowers.
The Mola is rich in endemic species, such as the ‘Saxifraga corsica subsp. cossoniana ‘, a tiny plant with white flowers. But it is precisely the endemism that generates fascination for its rarity. In Formentera there are more than twenty endemic plants.


Mariupol: beauty demolished by war

In these first weeks of 2022, in which so many news and images have arrived from Ukraine, we have often heard about the cities of this country that we knew something about.
Kiev, the capital has always been known to everyone, but Mariupol and other minor realities have been attacked by the war reports because they were targeted by the bombing of the Russian attacks during the military invasion.

But what was Mariupol like before tanks and bombs passed through here? Surely the position on the sea of Azov made and will make it (soon we all hope) a seaside and tourist city in all respects.
Not only.
Mariupol has a metallurgical factory founded in 1897 that produces hot rolled steel, which is ideal for the construction of ships, oil and gas pipelines.
Unsurprisingly, it was a Russian target for this reason as well.

Mariupol, Ukraine, aerial view

The city center of Mariupol, as it was before the bombing of these first months of 2022, deserves a visit and a few stops among the monuments of the city.

Russian Orthodox Church in Mariupol, Ukraine
Russian Orthodox Church in Mariupol, Ukraine

Passing from the Orthodox church (photo above), up to the Mosque, then to the Cathedral of Archangel Michael and the small monuments such as the Crocodile Goji in Primorsky boulevard.
The peace bell, as never before, should be one of the most representative monuments (if still present).

Ukraine.Mariupol. Mosque of Suleiman and Roksolana
Ukraine. Mariupol. Suleiman and Roksolana Mosque

War now

Vostochnyi district of Mariupol city (Ukraine) after missile attack of the pro-russian terrorists. January 24, 2015. - The cars which burned down on a parking.
Vostochnyi district of the city of Mariupol (Ukraine) – Shutterstock photo

Although Mariupol is not new to terrorist attacks or guerrillas (the photo above refers to a terrorist attack on January 24, 2015), the wound carved by Russian troops in this war is truly violent.
We have seen shocking images passing through TV, newspapers and the internet without the slightest pause giving a little respite.
Above all, the bombed children’s hospital and the transport of the wounded out of the destroyed building.
A situation that our society, defined as civil, should not even dare to imagine.
Let alone accept.

MARIUPOL, UKRAINE - JULY 19, 2015: Mother with baby walking near of destroyed building of Mariupol Police City Department
Mariupol

In order not to fall into the error of spreading incorrect information, we will simply conclude by hoping to see these and all the other Ukrainian cities shine with their beauty, with all their tourists (including Russians of course), their traditions and local festivals soon.
So that hatred, war and injustice can be fought peacefully.






The Wienerwald: the Viennese forest, a UNESCO biosphere reserve

Contrary to what you might think, Vienna has a green lung made up of woods, vineyards and meadows to the west of the city. It extends from the outlying districts of the city to the countryside of Lower Austria. We are talking about the Vienna Woods, one of the 727 UNESCO Biosphere Reserves in the world, but the only one, at least among the European ones, located on the edge of a metropolis. It covers an area of approximately 105,000 hectares and extends over seven of the 23 Viennese municipal districts, and over 51 municipalities in the Lower Austria region.

It is a territory where man and nature coexist and benefit from each other. The intertwining of forests and settlement areas, as well as the contrasts between rural areas and the metropolis, produce special natural conditions and at the same time represent a great challenge. The goal is to protect natural habitats and plant and animal species by creating the conditions for responsible development.
More than 60% of the area is covered by forests, the effect of which on the climate, air and water balance is fundamental for the entire metropolitan area. The Viennese Wood in all seasons is a recreational area much loved by residents, a destination for trips and excursions in all seasons: in spring, when primroses appear and the forest smells of wild garlic; in summer, when it becomes an oasis of coolness, where you can find refuge from the heat of the city; in autumn, when the foliage transforms the green of the leaves into yellow and red. But even in winter, with bare trees, its landscapes have an irresistible charm.

Wienerwald
Image by Katharina Jankele from Pixabay

In addition to forests, meadows and vineyards characterize the landscape. There are 33 forest associations and 23 open grasslands, in which very specific animals and plants live. In dry meadows, for example, pulsatilla and yellow hadonide can be found. Siberian iris and marsh gentian grow in wet meadows.
With a variety of 70 plant species and 560 animal species per hectare, lean lawns not only display unexpected richness, but are also particularly beautiful thanks to showy blooms.
Then there are small peat bog meadows, now rarefied, habitat of orchids, amphibians, dragonflies, cicadas and many other insects. In the eyes of hikers and nature lovers, the colorful meadows of the Viennese Wood are the original image of “unspoiled nature”, but all these meadows and pastures exist only thanks to centuries of cultivation by man.
With the disappearance of agricultural use, the meadow would return to the state of forest, through various evolutionary stages.
Finally there are the vineyards: the wine-growing landscapes have motivated the designation of the Wienerwald as a UNESCO biosphere reserve.
On the sunny slopes of the Viennese Wood, viticulture draws the landscape, together with fruit trees, hedges, and stone walls, the latter also surprising natural habitats.

All images from the opening of the Game of Thrones Studio Tour Ireland

Excited visitors to the new Game of Thrones Studio Tour, the new tourist attraction located in Northern Ireland, were greeted by fan favorites Isaac Hempstead Wright (“Bran Stark”), Kristian Nairn (“Hodor”) and Nathalie Emmanuel (“Missandei “).

Located in one of the original filming locations of the acclaimed series at Linen Mill Studios in Banbridge, Northern Ireland, the Game of Thrones Studio Tour brings fans closer than ever to the Seven Kingdoms universe.

And from today, guests can enter the iconic Great Hall of Winterfell where Jon Snow was proclaimed “King of the North”, see Daenerys Targaryen’s towering Dragonstone throne, see the incredible props up close, weapons and visual effects of the series and discover some secrets of the craftsmanship and craftsmanship that helped to “transport” the show from the pages of the script to the screen. The immersive experience brings Westeros to life and evokes the epic map of the show: King’s Landing, Winterfell, Dragonstone, The Barrier and the lands beyond The Barrier.

Costume Gallery
Costume Gallery

Julian Moon, Head of EMEA Warner Bros. Consumer Products, commented, “What an incredible honor to open the doors of the first Game of Thrones Studio Tour today. This is the first time Warner Bros. Themed Entertainment has launched a world-class attraction. in Northern Ireland where fans can explore, up close and in person, a wide range of authentic sets, as well as a full collection of costumes, props, set pieces and more.
We are incredibly grateful for our partnership with Linen Mill Studios who helped bring this project to life with the utmost attention to detail, proportions and depth of production, elements that make this experience so special and noteworthy.
We are proud to be part of the legacy of beloved Game of Thrones franchise and we can’t wait for fans around the world to enter and immerse themselves in all corners of the Seven Kingdoms and beyond. “
 

Andrew Webb and David Browne, executive directors of Linen Mill Studios, commented, “February 4th truly represents a new and exciting chapter in Game of Thrones history. Here at Linen Mill Studios in Banbridge, Northern Ireland, after many years of planning, design and construction, we are thrilled to finally open our doors to guests and allow them to approach the Seven Kingdoms like never before, through the world’s first and only Game of Thrones Studio Tour.
Housed in one of the original shooting studios, this incredible and unique experience brings the making of Game of Thrones to life through a wide range of authentic sets, props and costumes, along with engaging interactive moments and exclusive behind-the-scenes content.
On behalf of all those who helped create Game of Thrones Studio Tour and the dedicated team of Linen Mill Studios, creator of this experience, I say that we are proud to be part of a legacy as alive as that of Game of Thrones, legacy. that will delight current and future fans of the show, as well as those interested in the craftsmanship that literally brings an iconic production to life. “

Niall Gibbons, CEO of Tourism Ireland: “It is wonderful to be present at the opening of Game of Thrones Studio Tour at Linen Mill Studios.
We are constantly working to revive tourism from abroad: the opening of this world-class tourist attraction is extraordinary news for flows to Northern Ireland and helps give us a significant ‘stand-out’ in a very competitive international market.
It will provide fans of the series and those interested in film and TV making one more reason to book a trip to Ireland Northern Ireland Tourism is delighted to have brought 45 international journalists and influencers from 12 countries to discover the Game of Thrones Studio Tour this week to experience this exceptional new attraction firsthand. We will do everything we can to promote Game of Thrones Studio Tour and Northern Ireland. “

HBO’s Game of Thrones aired in more than 200 countries and territories, culminating in record ratings. Game of Thrones continues to engage passionate fans and ignite public enthusiasm with the next step in the franchise, House of the Dragon, first scheduled for 2022 on HBO and HBO Max.
www.gameofthronesstudiotour.com

About Linen Mill Studios

Located in Banbridge, County Down, Northern Ireland, Linen Mill Studios are part of John Hogg & Co, a Northern Irish family business that has been operating successfully since the 1800s. Established in 1800, the Linen Mill headquarters in Banbridge was used exclusively for linen production. Following a significant decline in the local linen industry in 2008, interaction with HBO came to life.
In subsequent years, one-third of 75% of the Game of Thrones series shot in Northern Ireland was filmed at Linen Mill Studios, including filming the final eighth season in 2018. With its doors opening in February 2022, the Linen Mill Studios Game of Thrones Studio Tour is the latest chapter in the history of the Linen Mill and represents an excellent example of the reconversion of a piece of industrial architecture.

Information on COVID-19

The safety of guests and staff is the number one priority of the Game of Thrones Studio Tour. For more information, see www.gameofthronesstudiotour.com

GAME OF THRONES and all related characters and elements © & ™ Home Box Office, Inc. (s22)